WEEK 3. MICROBIOME
PEEK-A-BOO! i see you... and i know what you do
MAP OF moyashimon
«Moyashimon» is an extraordinary serial based on the idea that a young man named Sawaki can see microorganisms with his naked eye and communicate with them

sawaki and kei
Sawaki and his best friend kei enter an agricultural university. Sawaki's family has a yeast-growing factory while Sei's family owns a sake brewery. Therefore, both characters' lives have always been close to fermenting yeasts
agricultural university
this is it
professor
An eccentric professor who studies bacteria, fungus and fermentation...
Hasegawa
...with his postgraduate Hasegawa adapts friends at the university
fungus, microbes and bacteria
But the most important characters are fungus, microbes and bacteria that populate the world and create multicellular organisms
fungus, microbes and bacteria

Microorganisms make air and soil. AND "Moyashimon" gives us characters and methods that makes us think about microorganisms and microbiology
Microorganisms make air and soil. AND "Moyashimon" gives us characters and methods that makes us think about microorganisms and microbiology
Microbiology Online has been devised by the Microbiology Society, the largest learned microbiological society in Europe. This inspirational online resource supports the teaching and learning of microbiology in the classroom across the key stages. It explores how microbes can be friend and foe and most importantly, why we need these invisible organisms to live.
Fungi can be single celled or very complex multicellular organisms. They are found in just about any habitat but most live on the land, mainly in soil or on plant material rather than in sea or fresh water.
Prepared for an ANU Humanities Research Centre Symposium in early August 2003, these notes may be considered as a comment on Brian Massumi's proposition that 'a political ecology would be a social technology of belonging, assuming coexistence and co-becoming as the habitat of practices.
Stengers, Isabelle. Introductory notes on an ecology of practices. Cultural studies review 11, no. 1 (2005): 183-196